Why Teachers Quit their Jobs: Honest Reasons Reviewed

Why Teachers Quit their Jobs: Honest Reasons Reviewed.

Why Teachers Quit their Jobs: You might be wondering, why do teachers who are really good and zealous about their jobs leave their jobs. In this article, we will explain why.

Why Teachers Quit their Jobs

Reasons Why Teachers Quit the Jobs

Lack of a Support System, Especially in the First Few Years

Being a new teacher can be especially overwhelming. Without proper support, it’s tough to make a go of it.

In fact, current statistics show that new teachers leave at rates of somewhere between 19% and 30% over their first five years of teaching.

Challenging Work Conditions

Buildings are falling apart, a lack of basic classroom materials, large class sizes, and overwhelming expectations. Teachers are challenged by the enormity of the job.

Joan F. agrees, citing a laundry list of complaints. “Unmanageable class size, lack of materials, crappy building conditions, working 10–15 hour days and weekends, ineffective administrators, frivolous meetings and regulations, no support for discipline problems, etc.”

The pay is pretty terrible in many cases.

It’s no secret that teachers are grossly underpaid in most school districts, but people don’t actually realize how bad it can get. In Oklahoma, teachers had to protest in order to obtain a living wage—and that’s not the only place in the country where this has happened, either.

Though the national average for public school teachers’ salaries was a very decent $56,736, many districts don’t have the kind of funding needed to support their educators. In many states, the average public school teacher salary tends to be under $40,000 a year.

The starting salary is a paltry $38,000 on average. It takes ten years of experience to get the respectable salaries that are advertised. What most people don’t realize is that most teachers leave the teaching profession before they get that amount of experience.

That amount of money isn’t always capable of supporting a family, or even a single person in certain situations. When you combine low wages with bad benefits that are now vanishing, it’s an ugly look.

Under Respected

Many teachers feel the negative effects of what they perceive as a lack of respect. A recent report from Penn State University and the non-profit Robert Wood Johnson Foundation claims among professional occupations, teachers rate lowest in feeling that their opinions count at work.

More and more, when a child doesn’t do well in school, the teacher is the first person to be blamed. Students who dislike teachers or their teaching methods, or who simply take issue with their authority will not see the value of a teacher’s time. Statewide budget cuts make teachers feel as though their work isn’t valued and force them to make do with inadequate preparation and supplies. Because teaching is such a public profession, it’s easy for people to find fault in teachers. And when they do, it’s hard to want to continue.

Overwhelming Stress

The emotional stress teachers are dealing with seems to be at an all-time high. In fact, a national survey shows that 58 percent of classroom teachers describe their mental health as “not good.” And another survey confirms that nearly two-thirds feel their jobs are “always” or “often” stressful—roughly double the rates of stress experienced by the general workforce. Working under such conditions is untenable. Educators cannot do their best for students when they are struggling with the physical and mental effects of stress.

They are constantly asked for money.

They are constantly asked for money.

Teachers are routinely asked to donate money to support their underprivileged students, such as help pay for their utility bills, contribute to the student holiday shopping fund, or bring in food for families in need.

In addition, they’re asked to contribute to the school’s hospitality fund for staff parties and other events and to help with meals for staff members who are unable to work due to poor health or a family emergency.

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