Where To Sell Beanie Babies For Fast Money 2021

Where To Sell Beanie Babies For Money: If you’re ready to part with your collection, learning how to sell Beanie Babies can help you get the most money for these popular stuffed animals.

From figuring out the value of Beanie Babies to learning how to market these furry friends, there are some important skills that can make the difference between getting a few dollars or hundreds.

where to sell beanie babies for money

Beanie Babies were a hot commodity in the 1990s. People spent millions on the pellet-filled toys at their peak, and some even went as far as to forge checks and burgle toy distributors to fill out their collections.

So-called “Beanie Mania” was driven by the idea that the stuffed animals would grow in value over time—a gamble that led to disappointment for many owners. But while the majority of Beanie Babies sold decades ago aren’t worth much money today, a select few are worth a small fortune.

According to Dr. Lori Verderame, an antique appraiser with expertise in Beanie Babies who spoke with us for this article, some Beanie Babies sell for thousands of dollars.

Before you list your childhood toys on eBay, it helps to know if you’re sitting on a gold mine or thrift store material. We spoke with Dr. Lori about what to look for after taking your Beanie Baby collection out of storage and how to potentially make some money from it.

Best Websites to Sell Beanie Babies

When it comes to selling toys, usually the internet can fetch you more money. The best places to sell Beanie Babies, if you have valuable ones, is also online. Collectors will be out trolling for Beanies in antique shops and flea markets, sure, but if you want to be able to reach the most collectors and even have them compete for your collection, online is the place to go!

1. Craigslist

Craigslist is a good way to find collectors in your area if you’re the type to prefer supporting your local collectibles traders.

2. eBay

The usual go-to for online sales, eBay has already been used to sell hundreds of Beanie Babies for up to $60,000! The great thing about eBay is you have the choice of selling for a flat rate or putting your Beanie Babies up for auction, to potentially earn more (or less).

3. Etsy

There are Beanie Babies on sale on Etsy for up to $75,000. However, Etsy is more the place to go if you want to sell to nostalgic buyers, as the majority of offers are in the $3-5 range.

4. Sell2BBNovelties

This is a specialty site specifically designed for people looking to sell all kinds of collectibles, Beanie Babies included. As a neat bonus, if you sell more than $30 worth of merchandise to them, shipping is free.

5. PlushCollector.com

PlushCollector.com is another option that works similarly to that of Sell2BBNovelties.  So, if you want to sell to a company rather than do it on your own, it’s another one to consider.

Refer to the link below to see what they can offer you as well as what Beanie Babies they are accepting at the time of submission.

6. Sell4Value

The Sell4Value retailer will buy any rare Beanies, regardless of its condition, at least according to the website.

While they are picky in what they accept, you may want to at least check out the list to see if you have any of the ones mentioned.  If so, you may want to consider at least getting a quote.

Nonetheless, it’s an option to consider if you want a quote right now.

7. Facebook Marketplace

Consider the Facebook Marketplace to be an option; however, the only problem is that you’re only targeting a local audience.  This may not work well for Beanie Babies as they more than likely won’t be in demand.

sell beanie babies

8. Facebook Groups

Facebook Groups are a pinch different than the marketplace as you can cater more to a targeted crowd.

It’s as easy as joining the group, posting what you have, and then working out a deal with anyone who responds.  Just make sure you read the rules before posting to make sure you get your post approved.

Follow the link below to find a group near you.

9. Local Antiques Shops

There are antique shops in just about every community, and they can be a good choice if you want to sell with a hands-off approach. You can use a tool like Find Antique Malls to find antique dealers near you that buy antiques.

  • Visit the shop first, and look at the stock: if they sell only glass, they probably won’t buy your chair.
  • Check the prices. Higher-end shops may pay you more for your antique or collectible than a shop that looks like it doesn’t sell anything for more than $25.
  • Before you bring in something to sell, chat with the manager or owner and see if they are interested in buying. Don’t take rejection personally. Dealers have money tied up in stock, and it’s not always possible for them to purchase on a moment’s notice.
  • Get a detailed receipt of the sale.

10. Flea Markets – Great for Low to Mid-Priced Antiques

Flea markets are a great option if you want to reach a large audience and avoid paying commissions. You pay for a table or booth, which can run from about $10 and up, depending on the market.

  • Check out local advertisements, then contact the market director. Established markets may have pecking orders (who gets a table where), so you may not get the premium booth you desire.
  • Expect to set up early and break down late. Markets run by rules, and you need to follow them.
  • Come prepared with covers for your antiques (in case it rains), sunshades or umbrellas for you, tables, chairs, water, food, etc.
  • Mark all items with prices; nothing turns off buyers more than assuming you assign prices based on a whim.
  • Expect to be offered less than the asking price, which you can turn down courteously.

11. Consignment Shops

At a consignment shop, you place an item for sale, the shop does the work and then takes a percentage. . This makes them great for selling vintage collectibles or clothing.

  • Sometimes consignment shops benefit charities, so you are doing good, as well as making money.
  • Stop in and meet with the manager to see what the shop specializes in, how long they keep your item on the floor, and when or if they reduce the price over time.
  • Complete a consignment form.
  • Make sure you know if you are expected to bring large items to the shop, or if the shop can arrange for pick-up.
  • The shop takes a percentage of the selling price. In the case of clothing or other textiles, the items have to be cleaned and ready to sell, so that might cost you time and effort.

12. Ruby Lane

Think of Ruby Lane like a virtual antique mall. Just as you’d have a stall or booth at an antique mall, you have a storefront on Ruby Lane. You pay a premium to be part of the service, but there are some advantages too.

Set-up fees can top $100 with about $69 per month in regular maintenance fees on top of that. However, for that price, you get to list up to 80 items, and you don’t have to pay a commission when something sells.

This makes it a good option for higher-value antiques, which could have substantial commission fees on eBay or Etsy.

  • Ruby Lane is a specialty service, which means people come here to specifically shop for antiques and collectibles.
  • Although the up-front costs are high, the lack of commission can work out well if you sell high-value items.
  • If you want to list more than 80 items each month, you can pay a small fee to do that.

13. TIAS

If you want to sell a lot of smaller antiques, consider TIAS (The Internet Antique Store). This site, which has been around since 1995, does not charge per-item fees or a set-up charge for your shop. However, you pay about $35 to $40 per month, and there’s a 10% commission. 

  • You can sell just about any type of antique on TIAS, but it’s especially suited to things like figurines, costume jewelry, and paper ephemera.
  • TIAS isn’t as popular as some other antique sites, which means you may need to do some of the promotion yourself.
  • You’ll handle listing and photographing items, shipping them, and interacting with customers.

Other Options

If you want to sell on your own, there are even more options, including:

beanie babies

How Much Can You Sell Beanie Babies for?

As we explained in our rent post about selling Legos, it depends on what you have. Most are not worth that much money. Although you will find sellers listing some for over $20,000, nobody is actually buying them for such crazy prices. Most end up selling for $10-$20.

That said, there are valuable Beanie Babies that can sell for big money. And there are collectors who will pay good money for the right one.

Some of the most valuable Beanie Babies include:

  • Snort the Red Bull
  • Jake the Duck
  • Patti the Platypus
  • Peace Bear
  • Princess the Bear
  • Valentino Beanie
  • Claude the Crab
  • Bubbles

The easiest way to find out who much you can realistically sell yours for is to look at the ones that have actually SOLD on eBay, Etsy, or other sites. That can give you a good idea of how much to list yours for.

Final Thoughts

In the future, I would like to talk about the many hot collectibles of the past and the many ways you can capitalize on today’s market.  I thought it would be fun to see how much you could make today if you were to own a Beanie Babies collection. 

If you have a collection, either big or small, be sure to take a look at the many options I mentioned above.

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