Waterfalls Near Me and 40 Best Waterfalls Across the United States

– Waterfalls Near Me –

Are you looking for some gorgeous waterfalls around the US? If yes, then you’re in luck. This is because we’ve compiled all the information you’ll need to discover waterfalls around you in one location!

Continue reading to find out where some amazing and top waterfalls in the United States are located. Some of these 30+ greatest waterfalls may surprise you with how near they are to where you live.

Waterfalls Near Me and 40 Best Waterfalls Across the United States

When it comes to natural wonders, waterfalls are unquestionably at the top of the list, which is why so many people, including ourselves, are enamored with them.

As a result, we’ve compiled a list of 30+ waterfalls throughout the United States that you may visit and add to your bucket list.

30+ Best Waterfalls Across the US 

Below are some of the top waterfalls near me and across the United States:

1. Caney Falls

Bankhead, AL, Alabama

Waterfalls Near Me and 40 Best Waterfalls Across the United States

Caney Creek Falls and Upper Caney Creek Falls are some of the most magnificent cascades in Alabama, located outside the Sipsey Wilderness in Double Springs.

Among a beautiful hidden region on the top of the Creek of Caney, in the moss-capped rocks and evergreen trees, an easy 3-mile walk through deep forests and green underwater reach the drops throughout the year.

Heavy rainfall produces two water curtains, which are flowing from the board to the bottom of the swimming hole. Be careful about the approach to the caves and the path out of the canyon is steep, and prepare yourself for training.

2. Grotto Falls

East Tennessee

Waterfalls Near Me and 40 Best Waterfalls Across the United States

Get out of the parking lot on the Roaring Fork Nature Trail into a lovely hemlock wood along the Trillium Gap Trail.

Walkthrough an extensive forest of bees, silvers, and maples visited by visitors to the park and pileated woodpeckers and flames transporting supplies to the LeConte lodge for one mile.

Following the first stretch, you will hear Roaring Fork, a constantly rising rumbling that flows down the west side of the Little Pigeon River from Mt LeConte.

You will reach Grotto Falls on a straight stretch of descent. Just a mile of easy walking, you can get to the beautiful Appalachian waterfall and the only waterway in the Smokies that you may stroll.

3. Nugget Falls

Juneau, Alaska

Waterfalls aren't the first thing that comes to mind when most people think of the Midwest.  Potato River Falls, near Gurney, Wisconsin, has been dubbed one of the region's most stunning waterfalls. The falls are clearly visible from various paths at the end of Potato River Falls Road in a county park.  The Upper and Lower Falls of the waterfall tumble 90 feet into the river. Hikers can reach the top of Potato River Falls by following the river bank on the half-mile route that leads to Upper Falls.  Autumn tourists will also have some fantastic opportunities to capture the fall hues.  33. Stepstone Falls in West Greenwich Rhode Island  At the end of the Ben Utter Trail, you'll find Stepstone Falls, a moderate cascade. It gets its name from the way the water rushes over the flat edges of the rocks, giving it the appearance of a slew of little stairs.  34. Sahalie Falls  Oregon  It is a 0.5 mile long one-way path that runs along a lush woodland beside the river, and the most stunning light blue water you will ever find.  Sahalie Falls is 100 feet (30 m) of spraying white water over a natural lava barrage. The film "Homeward bound" by Disney is stunning enough.  Koosah Falls descends to a deep pool around 21 m (70 ft) and offers a less spectacular but still worth viewing perspective. Go north and start with Koosah Falls (parking is better at Koosah.)  35. Tokatee Falls  Oregon  The observation point for this two-tiered waterfall roaring into the pools below is a short 0.6-mile hike. The higher falls drop 40 feet, while the lower falls plummet 80 feet over a steep basalt wall.  The route travels through a Douglas-fir, Western red cedar, large leaf maple, and Pacific yew old-growth forest. The North Umpqua Wild and Scenic River may be seen flowing down a tight rock canyon at many locations.  36. McWay Falls  California  McWay Falls is a definite highlight of a Big Sur road trip in California, known more for its spectacular coastal surrounds than the majesty of the Falls themselves.  McWay Falls, in Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park, is formed by water that falls straight from McWay Creek into the ocean (or the sand, depending on the tide levels).  The Falls truly come alive after sunset.  Hiking down to the bottom is both unlawful and dangerous. If they catch you, you might face a $300 fine. Ask a park ranger whether you can paddle down to the bottom in a kayak, as some people have done.  37. Seven Falls  South Cheyenne Canyon, Colorado  Visit Seven Falls in South Cheyenne Canyon, just outside of Colorado Springs, for a look at Colorado's unique natural wonder.  Climb the 224 stairs to the summit of the mountain to see the falls, or use the in-mountain elevator for a more relaxing ride. That's one method to make sure you get your daily steps!  38. Calf Creek Falls  Capitol Reef National Park, Utah  The Calf Creek Falls is only one of the many beautiful features of the Grand Staircase-Escalante region, which has some of the country's most stunning desert terrain.  Hikers must walk past beaver ponds and prehistoric rock art sites en route to the foot of the falls in order to reach the cascade.  39. Mesa Falls  Idaho  Lower Mesa Falls and Upper Mesa Falls are stunning waterfalls on the Henrys Fork of the Snake River in Idaho's Caribou-Targhee National Forest.  The river cascades down a small valley surrounded by thick greenery and steep wooded cliffs, over million-year-old volcanic rock. It was the first time my children had been so close to such a tremendous waterfall, and they were blown away.  Upper Mesa Falls includes a small boardwalk with several perspectives. Lower Mesa Falls is seen from Grandview Overlook and provides a long-distance view of the falls.  If you're looking for a little more adventure, there's a mile trek between the two waterfalls.  40. Ruby Falls  Chattanooga  While it may not be as magnificent or big as some of the other waterfalls on our top of the list, its distinctiveness as an underground waterfall and the tale of its discovery make it worthy of inclusion.  We followed the trail taken by its discoverer, Leo Lambert, in 1928, 260 feet down within the mountain, except he crawled through narrow places.  The stalagmites, stalagmites, and unique and magnificent rock formations are now illuminated by colorful lights.  The conclusion of the route leads to Ruby Falls, which is rendered even more stunning by the colorful light show that surrounds it. It is the United States' highest and deepest subterranean waterfall exposed to the public.  Read Also: Things to do in Nashville Things to do in California Bengal Cats for Sale  Every waterfall has its own individuality, from thunderous cascades to fantasy trickles. Some are tall and thin, rushing down cliff faces into swirling whirlpools below.  Others are gauzier, spreading out on rock and moss stairs. When the falls are frozen solid in winter, you may walk behind some of them and climb on others.  You're going to have to work up a sweat to get to some of the greatest waterfalls. They do, however, provide a refreshing respite and a striking reminder of nature's might.  Waterfalls cascade through national parks and preserves and are nestled away in state parks only known to locals. Waterfall enthusiasts will trek or bike thousands of kilometers to witness these outstanding examples of nature in action.  Please leave a comment, like this article on the Waterfalls Near Me, and tell your friends and family about it!

Nugget Falls is on a cliff near Mendenhall Glacier. It may be too chilly to swim in, but you may go up to the foot of the fall and experience its mist.

If you appreciate animals, you’ll be glad to hear that you’ll most likely encounter beavers, bald eagles, mountain goats, and even bears along the trail.

Big Goat Falls is a stunning cascade that should not be missed. It is within Misty Fjords National Monument and has an elevation of 1831 feet and a drop of 800 feet.

Read Also:

4. Falls Park

Greenville, SC

Waterfalls aren't the first thing that comes to mind when most people think of the Midwest.  Potato River Falls, near Gurney, Wisconsin, has been dubbed one of the region's most stunning waterfalls. The falls are clearly visible from various paths at the end of Potato River Falls Road in a county park.  The Upper and Lower Falls of the waterfall tumble 90 feet into the river. Hikers can reach the top of Potato River Falls by following the river bank on the half-mile route that leads to Upper Falls.  Autumn tourists will also have some fantastic opportunities to capture the fall hues.  33. Stepstone Falls in West Greenwich Rhode Island  At the end of the Ben Utter Trail, you'll find Stepstone Falls, a moderate cascade. It gets its name from the way the water rushes over the flat edges of the rocks, giving it the appearance of a slew of little stairs.  34. Sahalie Falls  Oregon  It is a 0.5 mile long one-way path that runs along a lush woodland beside the river, and the most stunning light blue water you will ever find.  Sahalie Falls is 100 feet (30 m) of spraying white water over a natural lava barrage. The film "Homeward bound" by Disney is stunning enough.  Koosah Falls descends to a deep pool around 21 m (70 ft) and offers a less spectacular but still worth viewing perspective. Go north and start with Koosah Falls (parking is better at Koosah.)  35. Tokatee Falls  Oregon  The observation point for this two-tiered waterfall roaring into the pools below is a short 0.6-mile hike. The higher falls drop 40 feet, while the lower falls plummet 80 feet over a steep basalt wall.  The route travels through a Douglas-fir, Western red cedar, large leaf maple, and Pacific yew old-growth forest. The North Umpqua Wild and Scenic River may be seen flowing down a tight rock canyon at many locations.  36. McWay Falls  California  McWay Falls is a definite highlight of a Big Sur road trip in California, known more for its spectacular coastal surrounds than the majesty of the Falls themselves.  McWay Falls, in Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park, is formed by water that falls straight from McWay Creek into the ocean (or the sand, depending on the tide levels).  The Falls truly come alive after sunset.  Hiking down to the bottom is both unlawful and dangerous. If they catch you, you might face a $300 fine. Ask a park ranger whether you can paddle down to the bottom in a kayak, as some people have done.  37. Seven Falls  South Cheyenne Canyon, Colorado  Visit Seven Falls in South Cheyenne Canyon, just outside of Colorado Springs, for a look at Colorado's unique natural wonder.  Climb the 224 stairs to the summit of the mountain to see the falls, or use the in-mountain elevator for a more relaxing ride. That's one method to make sure you get your daily steps!  38. Calf Creek Falls  Capitol Reef National Park, Utah  The Calf Creek Falls is only one of the many beautiful features of the Grand Staircase-Escalante region, which has some of the country's most stunning desert terrain.  Hikers must walk past beaver ponds and prehistoric rock art sites en route to the foot of the falls in order to reach the cascade.  39. Mesa Falls  Idaho  Lower Mesa Falls and Upper Mesa Falls are stunning waterfalls on the Henrys Fork of the Snake River in Idaho's Caribou-Targhee National Forest.  The river cascades down a small valley surrounded by thick greenery and steep wooded cliffs, over million-year-old volcanic rock. It was the first time my children had been so close to such a tremendous waterfall, and they were blown away.  Upper Mesa Falls includes a small boardwalk with several perspectives. Lower Mesa Falls is seen from Grandview Overlook and provides a long-distance view of the falls.  If you're looking for a little more adventure, there's a mile trek between the two waterfalls.  40. Ruby Falls  Chattanooga  While it may not be as magnificent or big as some of the other waterfalls on our top of the list, its distinctiveness as an underground waterfall and the tale of its discovery make it worthy of inclusion.  We followed the trail taken by its discoverer, Leo Lambert, in 1928, 260 feet down within the mountain, except he crawled through narrow places.  The stalagmites, stalagmites, and unique and magnificent rock formations are now illuminated by colorful lights.  The conclusion of the route leads to Ruby Falls, which is rendered even more stunning by the colorful light show that surrounds it. It is the United States' highest and deepest subterranean waterfall exposed to the public.  Read Also: Things to do in Nashville Things to do in California Bengal Cats for Sale  Every waterfall has its own individuality, from thunderous cascades to fantasy trickles. Some are tall and thin, rushing down cliff faces into swirling whirlpools below.  Others are gauzier, spreading out on rock and moss stairs. When the falls are frozen solid in winter, you may walk behind some of them and climb on others.  You're going to have to work up a sweat to get to some of the greatest waterfalls. They do, however, provide a refreshing respite and a striking reminder of nature's might.  Waterfalls cascade through national parks and preserves and are nestled away in state parks only known to locals. Waterfall enthusiasts will trek or bike thousands of kilometers to witness these outstanding examples of nature in action.  Please leave a comment, like this article on the Waterfalls Near Me, and tell your friends and family about it!

The first waterfalls on our list are close to where you are.

Pack a picnic, relax on the adjacent swings, or take a stroll around Falls Park on the Reedy River in downtown Greenville to view the stunning waterfalls that run directly through our lovely city.

5. Chewacla Falls

Alabama

Waterfalls aren't the first thing that comes to mind when most people think of the Midwest.  Potato River Falls, near Gurney, Wisconsin, has been dubbed one of the region's most stunning waterfalls. The falls are clearly visible from various paths at the end of Potato River Falls Road in a county park.  The Upper and Lower Falls of the waterfall tumble 90 feet into the river. Hikers can reach the top of Potato River Falls by following the river bank on the half-mile route that leads to Upper Falls.  Autumn tourists will also have some fantastic opportunities to capture the fall hues.  33. Stepstone Falls in West Greenwich Rhode Island  At the end of the Ben Utter Trail, you'll find Stepstone Falls, a moderate cascade. It gets its name from the way the water rushes over the flat edges of the rocks, giving it the appearance of a slew of little stairs.  34. Sahalie Falls  Oregon  It is a 0.5 mile long one-way path that runs along a lush woodland beside the river, and the most stunning light blue water you will ever find.  Sahalie Falls is 100 feet (30 m) of spraying white water over a natural lava barrage. The film "Homeward bound" by Disney is stunning enough.  Koosah Falls descends to a deep pool around 21 m (70 ft) and offers a less spectacular but still worth viewing perspective. Go north and start with Koosah Falls (parking is better at Koosah.)  35. Tokatee Falls  Oregon  The observation point for this two-tiered waterfall roaring into the pools below is a short 0.6-mile hike. The higher falls drop 40 feet, while the lower falls plummet 80 feet over a steep basalt wall.  The route travels through a Douglas-fir, Western red cedar, large leaf maple, and Pacific yew old-growth forest. The North Umpqua Wild and Scenic River may be seen flowing down a tight rock canyon at many locations.  36. McWay Falls  California  McWay Falls is a definite highlight of a Big Sur road trip in California, known more for its spectacular coastal surrounds than the majesty of the Falls themselves.  McWay Falls, in Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park, is formed by water that falls straight from McWay Creek into the ocean (or the sand, depending on the tide levels).  The Falls truly come alive after sunset.  Hiking down to the bottom is both unlawful and dangerous. If they catch you, you might face a $300 fine. Ask a park ranger whether you can paddle down to the bottom in a kayak, as some people have done.  37. Seven Falls  South Cheyenne Canyon, Colorado  Visit Seven Falls in South Cheyenne Canyon, just outside of Colorado Springs, for a look at Colorado's unique natural wonder.  Climb the 224 stairs to the summit of the mountain to see the falls, or use the in-mountain elevator for a more relaxing ride. That's one method to make sure you get your daily steps!  38. Calf Creek Falls  Capitol Reef National Park, Utah  The Calf Creek Falls is only one of the many beautiful features of the Grand Staircase-Escalante region, which has some of the country's most stunning desert terrain.  Hikers must walk past beaver ponds and prehistoric rock art sites en route to the foot of the falls in order to reach the cascade.  39. Mesa Falls  Idaho  Lower Mesa Falls and Upper Mesa Falls are stunning waterfalls on the Henrys Fork of the Snake River in Idaho's Caribou-Targhee National Forest.  The river cascades down a small valley surrounded by thick greenery and steep wooded cliffs, over million-year-old volcanic rock. It was the first time my children had been so close to such a tremendous waterfall, and they were blown away.  Upper Mesa Falls includes a small boardwalk with several perspectives. Lower Mesa Falls is seen from Grandview Overlook and provides a long-distance view of the falls.  If you're looking for a little more adventure, there's a mile trek between the two waterfalls.  40. Ruby Falls  Chattanooga  While it may not be as magnificent or big as some of the other waterfalls on our top of the list, its distinctiveness as an underground waterfall and the tale of its discovery make it worthy of inclusion.  We followed the trail taken by its discoverer, Leo Lambert, in 1928, 260 feet down within the mountain, except he crawled through narrow places.  The stalagmites, stalagmites, and unique and magnificent rock formations are now illuminated by colorful lights.  The conclusion of the route leads to Ruby Falls, which is rendered even more stunning by the colorful light show that surrounds it. It is the United States' highest and deepest subterranean waterfall exposed to the public.  Read Also: Things to do in Nashville Things to do in California Bengal Cats for Sale  Every waterfall has its own individuality, from thunderous cascades to fantasy trickles. Some are tall and thin, rushing down cliff faces into swirling whirlpools below.  Others are gauzier, spreading out on rock and moss stairs. When the falls are frozen solid in winter, you may walk behind some of them and climb on others.  You're going to have to work up a sweat to get to some of the greatest waterfalls. They do, however, provide a refreshing respite and a striking reminder of nature's might.  Waterfalls cascade through national parks and preserves and are nestled away in state parks only known to locals. Waterfall enthusiasts will trek or bike thousands of kilometers to witness these outstanding examples of nature in action.  Please leave a comment, like this article on the Waterfalls Near Me, and tell your friends and family about it!

Cheaha Falls, a beautiful 30-foot cascade that flows from rocks along the Chinnabee Silent Trail on Cheaha Creek in the Talladega National Forest, is along the Chinnabee Silent Trail on Cheaha Creek in the Talladega National Forest.

The Talladega National Forest is also home to Mount Cheaha, Alabama’s tallest peak, and it’s here that Cheaha Creek originates, making its way down to the hill and forming the beautiful Cheaha Falls.

Also, the magnificent three-tiered cascade is a pleasant three-quarter-mile trek from the trail’s parking area on Talladega Scenic Byway or a one-mile trip from the Turnipseed Hunting Camp on Alabama Highway 281 where you may soak in the view, take a swim, or camp overnight.

6. Havasu Falls

Havasupai Indian Reservation, Arizona

Waterfalls aren't the first thing that comes to mind when most people think of the Midwest.  Potato River Falls, near Gurney, Wisconsin, has been dubbed one of the region's most stunning waterfalls. The falls are clearly visible from various paths at the end of Potato River Falls Road in a county park.  The Upper and Lower Falls of the waterfall tumble 90 feet into the river. Hikers can reach the top of Potato River Falls by following the river bank on the half-mile route that leads to Upper Falls.  Autumn tourists will also have some fantastic opportunities to capture the fall hues.  33. Stepstone Falls in West Greenwich Rhode Island  At the end of the Ben Utter Trail, you'll find Stepstone Falls, a moderate cascade. It gets its name from the way the water rushes over the flat edges of the rocks, giving it the appearance of a slew of little stairs.  34. Sahalie Falls  Oregon  It is a 0.5 mile long one-way path that runs along a lush woodland beside the river, and the most stunning light blue water you will ever find.  Sahalie Falls is 100 feet (30 m) of spraying white water over a natural lava barrage. The film "Homeward bound" by Disney is stunning enough.  Koosah Falls descends to a deep pool around 21 m (70 ft) and offers a less spectacular but still worth viewing perspective. Go north and start with Koosah Falls (parking is better at Koosah.)  35. Tokatee Falls  Oregon  The observation point for this two-tiered waterfall roaring into the pools below is a short 0.6-mile hike. The higher falls drop 40 feet, while the lower falls plummet 80 feet over a steep basalt wall.  The route travels through a Douglas-fir, Western red cedar, large leaf maple, and Pacific yew old-growth forest. The North Umpqua Wild and Scenic River may be seen flowing down a tight rock canyon at many locations.  36. McWay Falls  California  McWay Falls is a definite highlight of a Big Sur road trip in California, known more for its spectacular coastal surrounds than the majesty of the Falls themselves.  McWay Falls, in Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park, is formed by water that falls straight from McWay Creek into the ocean (or the sand, depending on the tide levels).  The Falls truly come alive after sunset.  Hiking down to the bottom is both unlawful and dangerous. If they catch you, you might face a $300 fine. Ask a park ranger whether you can paddle down to the bottom in a kayak, as some people have done.  37. Seven Falls  South Cheyenne Canyon, Colorado  Visit Seven Falls in South Cheyenne Canyon, just outside of Colorado Springs, for a look at Colorado's unique natural wonder.  Climb the 224 stairs to the summit of the mountain to see the falls, or use the in-mountain elevator for a more relaxing ride. That's one method to make sure you get your daily steps!  38. Calf Creek Falls  Capitol Reef National Park, Utah  The Calf Creek Falls is only one of the many beautiful features of the Grand Staircase-Escalante region, which has some of the country's most stunning desert terrain.  Hikers must walk past beaver ponds and prehistoric rock art sites en route to the foot of the falls in order to reach the cascade.  39. Mesa Falls  Idaho  Lower Mesa Falls and Upper Mesa Falls are stunning waterfalls on the Henrys Fork of the Snake River in Idaho's Caribou-Targhee National Forest.  The river cascades down a small valley surrounded by thick greenery and steep wooded cliffs, over million-year-old volcanic rock. It was the first time my children had been so close to such a tremendous waterfall, and they were blown away.  Upper Mesa Falls includes a small boardwalk with several perspectives. Lower Mesa Falls is seen from Grandview Overlook and provides a long-distance view of the falls.  If you're looking for a little more adventure, there's a mile trek between the two waterfalls.  40. Ruby Falls  Chattanooga  While it may not be as magnificent or big as some of the other waterfalls on our top of the list, its distinctiveness as an underground waterfall and the tale of its discovery make it worthy of inclusion.  We followed the trail taken by its discoverer, Leo Lambert, in 1928, 260 feet down within the mountain, except he crawled through narrow places.  The stalagmites, stalagmites, and unique and magnificent rock formations are now illuminated by colorful lights.  The conclusion of the route leads to Ruby Falls, which is rendered even more stunning by the colorful light show that surrounds it. It is the United States' highest and deepest subterranean waterfall exposed to the public.  Read Also: Things to do in Nashville Things to do in California Bengal Cats for Sale  Every waterfall has its own individuality, from thunderous cascades to fantasy trickles. Some are tall and thin, rushing down cliff faces into swirling whirlpools below.  Others are gauzier, spreading out on rock and moss stairs. When the falls are frozen solid in winter, you may walk behind some of them and climb on others.  You're going to have to work up a sweat to get to some of the greatest waterfalls. They do, however, provide a refreshing respite and a striking reminder of nature's might.  Waterfalls cascade through national parks and preserves and are nestled away in state parks only known to locals. Waterfall enthusiasts will trek or bike thousands of kilometers to witness these outstanding examples of nature in action.  Please leave a comment, like this article on the Waterfalls Near Me, and tell your friends and family about it!

Havasu Falls is located just outside Grand Canyon Park. It lies near Havasupai Indian Reservation and is a difficult waterfall to get to, but it is well worth visiting when you book, hike 10 miles, and camp in the desert overnight.

But the blue sea seems so lovely once you’re there.

7. High Bank Twin Falls

Ozark National Forest, Arkansas

Waterfalls aren't the first thing that comes to mind when most people think of the Midwest.  Potato River Falls, near Gurney, Wisconsin, has been dubbed one of the region's most stunning waterfalls. The falls are clearly visible from various paths at the end of Potato River Falls Road in a county park.  The Upper and Lower Falls of the waterfall tumble 90 feet into the river. Hikers can reach the top of Potato River Falls by following the river bank on the half-mile route that leads to Upper Falls.  Autumn tourists will also have some fantastic opportunities to capture the fall hues.  33. Stepstone Falls in West Greenwich Rhode Island  At the end of the Ben Utter Trail, you'll find Stepstone Falls, a moderate cascade. It gets its name from the way the water rushes over the flat edges of the rocks, giving it the appearance of a slew of little stairs.  34. Sahalie Falls  Oregon  It is a 0.5 mile long one-way path that runs along a lush woodland beside the river, and the most stunning light blue water you will ever find.  Sahalie Falls is 100 feet (30 m) of spraying white water over a natural lava barrage. The film "Homeward bound" by Disney is stunning enough.  Koosah Falls descends to a deep pool around 21 m (70 ft) and offers a less spectacular but still worth viewing perspective. Go north and start with Koosah Falls (parking is better at Koosah.)  35. Tokatee Falls  Oregon  The observation point for this two-tiered waterfall roaring into the pools below is a short 0.6-mile hike. The higher falls drop 40 feet, while the lower falls plummet 80 feet over a steep basalt wall.  The route travels through a Douglas-fir, Western red cedar, large leaf maple, and Pacific yew old-growth forest. The North Umpqua Wild and Scenic River may be seen flowing down a tight rock canyon at many locations.  36. McWay Falls  California  McWay Falls is a definite highlight of a Big Sur road trip in California, known more for its spectacular coastal surrounds than the majesty of the Falls themselves.  McWay Falls, in Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park, is formed by water that falls straight from McWay Creek into the ocean (or the sand, depending on the tide levels).  The Falls truly come alive after sunset.  Hiking down to the bottom is both unlawful and dangerous. If they catch you, you might face a $300 fine. Ask a park ranger whether you can paddle down to the bottom in a kayak, as some people have done.  37. Seven Falls  South Cheyenne Canyon, Colorado  Visit Seven Falls in South Cheyenne Canyon, just outside of Colorado Springs, for a look at Colorado's unique natural wonder.  Climb the 224 stairs to the summit of the mountain to see the falls, or use the in-mountain elevator for a more relaxing ride. That's one method to make sure you get your daily steps!  38. Calf Creek Falls  Capitol Reef National Park, Utah  The Calf Creek Falls is only one of the many beautiful features of the Grand Staircase-Escalante region, which has some of the country's most stunning desert terrain.  Hikers must walk past beaver ponds and prehistoric rock art sites en route to the foot of the falls in order to reach the cascade.  39. Mesa Falls  Idaho  Lower Mesa Falls and Upper Mesa Falls are stunning waterfalls on the Henrys Fork of the Snake River in Idaho's Caribou-Targhee National Forest.  The river cascades down a small valley surrounded by thick greenery and steep wooded cliffs, over million-year-old volcanic rock. It was the first time my children had been so close to such a tremendous waterfall, and they were blown away.  Upper Mesa Falls includes a small boardwalk with several perspectives. Lower Mesa Falls is seen from Grandview Overlook and provides a long-distance view of the falls.  If you're looking for a little more adventure, there's a mile trek between the two waterfalls.  40. Ruby Falls  Chattanooga  While it may not be as magnificent or big as some of the other waterfalls on our top of the list, its distinctiveness as an underground waterfall and the tale of its discovery make it worthy of inclusion.  We followed the trail taken by its discoverer, Leo Lambert, in 1928, 260 feet down within the mountain, except he crawled through narrow places.  The stalagmites, stalagmites, and unique and magnificent rock formations are now illuminated by colorful lights.  The conclusion of the route leads to Ruby Falls, which is rendered even more stunning by the colorful light show that surrounds it. It is the United States' highest and deepest subterranean waterfall exposed to the public.  Read Also: Things to do in Nashville Things to do in California Bengal Cats for Sale  Every waterfall has its own individuality, from thunderous cascades to fantasy trickles. Some are tall and thin, rushing down cliff faces into swirling whirlpools below.  Others are gauzier, spreading out on rock and moss stairs. When the falls are frozen solid in winter, you may walk behind some of them and climb on others.  You're going to have to work up a sweat to get to some of the greatest waterfalls. They do, however, provide a refreshing respite and a striking reminder of nature's might.  Waterfalls cascade through national parks and preserves and are nestled away in state parks only known to locals. Waterfall enthusiasts will trek or bike thousands of kilometers to witness these outstanding examples of nature in action.  Please leave a comment, like this article on the Waterfalls Near Me, and tell your friends and family about it!

The Twin Falls of High Bank is almost 75 feet tall. It split the drops into two streams which cascade into a pool below on layered rocks and rocks. And good news: less than a half-mile is the walk to get to it.

8. Yosemite Falls

Yosemite National Park, California

Were you aware of the highlight of all waterfalls in the magnificent Sierra Nevada? Yeah, those 3-star falls are 2,425 feet high! In the spring, when the winter snow melts, the ideal time to visit is.

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9. Ramsey Cascades

Waterfalls aren't the first thing that comes to mind when most people think of the Midwest.  Potato River Falls, near Gurney, Wisconsin, has been dubbed one of the region's most stunning waterfalls. The falls are clearly visible from various paths at the end of Potato River Falls Road in a county park.  The Upper and Lower Falls of the waterfall tumble 90 feet into the river. Hikers can reach the top of Potato River Falls by following the river bank on the half-mile route that leads to Upper Falls.  Autumn tourists will also have some fantastic opportunities to capture the fall hues.  33. Stepstone Falls in West Greenwich Rhode Island  At the end of the Ben Utter Trail, you'll find Stepstone Falls, a moderate cascade. It gets its name from the way the water rushes over the flat edges of the rocks, giving it the appearance of a slew of little stairs.  34. Sahalie Falls  Oregon  It is a 0.5 mile long one-way path that runs along a lush woodland beside the river, and the most stunning light blue water you will ever find.  Sahalie Falls is 100 feet (30 m) of spraying white water over a natural lava barrage. The film "Homeward bound" by Disney is stunning enough.  Koosah Falls descends to a deep pool around 21 m (70 ft) and offers a less spectacular but still worth viewing perspective. Go north and start with Koosah Falls (parking is better at Koosah.)  35. Tokatee Falls  Oregon  The observation point for this two-tiered waterfall roaring into the pools below is a short 0.6-mile hike. The higher falls drop 40 feet, while the lower falls plummet 80 feet over a steep basalt wall.  The route travels through a Douglas-fir, Western red cedar, large leaf maple, and Pacific yew old-growth forest. The North Umpqua Wild and Scenic River may be seen flowing down a tight rock canyon at many locations.  36. McWay Falls  California  McWay Falls is a definite highlight of a Big Sur road trip in California, known more for its spectacular coastal surrounds than the majesty of the Falls themselves.  McWay Falls, in Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park, is formed by water that falls straight from McWay Creek into the ocean (or the sand, depending on the tide levels).  The Falls truly come alive after sunset.  Hiking down to the bottom is both unlawful and dangerous. If they catch you, you might face a $300 fine. Ask a park ranger whether you can paddle down to the bottom in a kayak, as some people have done.  37. Seven Falls  South Cheyenne Canyon, Colorado  Visit Seven Falls in South Cheyenne Canyon, just outside of Colorado Springs, for a look at Colorado's unique natural wonder.  Climb the 224 stairs to the summit of the mountain to see the falls, or use the in-mountain elevator for a more relaxing ride. That's one method to make sure you get your daily steps!  38. Calf Creek Falls  Capitol Reef National Park, Utah  The Calf Creek Falls is only one of the many beautiful features of the Grand Staircase-Escalante region, which has some of the country's most stunning desert terrain.  Hikers must walk past beaver ponds and prehistoric rock art sites en route to the foot of the falls in order to reach the cascade.  39. Mesa Falls  Idaho  Lower Mesa Falls and Upper Mesa Falls are stunning waterfalls on the Henrys Fork of the Snake River in Idaho's Caribou-Targhee National Forest.  The river cascades down a small valley surrounded by thick greenery and steep wooded cliffs, over million-year-old volcanic rock. It was the first time my children had been so close to such a tremendous waterfall, and they were blown away.  Upper Mesa Falls includes a small boardwalk with several perspectives. Lower Mesa Falls is seen from Grandview Overlook and provides a long-distance view of the falls.  If you're looking for a little more adventure, there's a mile trek between the two waterfalls.  40. Ruby Falls  Chattanooga  While it may not be as magnificent or big as some of the other waterfalls on our top of the list, its distinctiveness as an underground waterfall and the tale of its discovery make it worthy of inclusion.  We followed the trail taken by its discoverer, Leo Lambert, in 1928, 260 feet down within the mountain, except he crawled through narrow places.  The stalagmites, stalagmites, and unique and magnificent rock formations are now illuminated by colorful lights.  The conclusion of the route leads to Ruby Falls, which is rendered even more stunning by the colorful light show that surrounds it. It is the United States' highest and deepest subterranean waterfall exposed to the public.  Read Also: Things to do in Nashville Things to do in California Bengal Cats for Sale  Every waterfall has its own individuality, from thunderous cascades to fantasy trickles. Some are tall and thin, rushing down cliff faces into swirling whirlpools below.  Others are gauzier, spreading out on rock and moss stairs. When the falls are frozen solid in winter, you may walk behind some of them and climb on others.  You're going to have to work up a sweat to get to some of the greatest waterfalls. They do, however, provide a refreshing respite and a striking reminder of nature's might.  Waterfalls cascade through national parks and preserves and are nestled away in state parks only known to locals. Waterfall enthusiasts will trek or bike thousands of kilometers to witness these outstanding examples of nature in action.  Please leave a comment, like this article on the Waterfalls Near Me, and tell your friends and family about it!

Another mature forest and one of the greatest getaways in Smokies on a warm summer day is an hour away from Grotto Falls via Gatlinburg.

On this somewhat challenging ride, you will finally turn from the parking lot into a rough (but still very visible) path which will welcome you through the enormous tulip trees, hemlocks, and large black cherry–some of the largest trees in the park!

You will also meet Ramsey Prong as your chattering, gurgling, rising buddy for practically all the rest of the walk.

10. Bridal Veil Falls

Telluride, Colorado

Waterfalls aren't the first thing that comes to mind when most people think of the Midwest.  Potato River Falls, near Gurney, Wisconsin, has been dubbed one of the region's most stunning waterfalls. The falls are clearly visible from various paths at the end of Potato River Falls Road in a county park.  The Upper and Lower Falls of the waterfall tumble 90 feet into the river. Hikers can reach the top of Potato River Falls by following the river bank on the half-mile route that leads to Upper Falls.  Autumn tourists will also have some fantastic opportunities to capture the fall hues.  33. Stepstone Falls in West Greenwich Rhode Island  At the end of the Ben Utter Trail, you'll find Stepstone Falls, a moderate cascade. It gets its name from the way the water rushes over the flat edges of the rocks, giving it the appearance of a slew of little stairs.  34. Sahalie Falls  Oregon  It is a 0.5 mile long one-way path that runs along a lush woodland beside the river, and the most stunning light blue water you will ever find.  Sahalie Falls is 100 feet (30 m) of spraying white water over a natural lava barrage. The film "Homeward bound" by Disney is stunning enough.  Koosah Falls descends to a deep pool around 21 m (70 ft) and offers a less spectacular but still worth viewing perspective. Go north and start with Koosah Falls (parking is better at Koosah.)  35. Tokatee Falls  Oregon  The observation point for this two-tiered waterfall roaring into the pools below is a short 0.6-mile hike. The higher falls drop 40 feet, while the lower falls plummet 80 feet over a steep basalt wall.  The route travels through a Douglas-fir, Western red cedar, large leaf maple, and Pacific yew old-growth forest. The North Umpqua Wild and Scenic River may be seen flowing down a tight rock canyon at many locations.  36. McWay Falls  California  McWay Falls is a definite highlight of a Big Sur road trip in California, known more for its spectacular coastal surrounds than the majesty of the Falls themselves.  McWay Falls, in Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park, is formed by water that falls straight from McWay Creek into the ocean (or the sand, depending on the tide levels).  The Falls truly come alive after sunset.  Hiking down to the bottom is both unlawful and dangerous. If they catch you, you might face a $300 fine. Ask a park ranger whether you can paddle down to the bottom in a kayak, as some people have done.  37. Seven Falls  South Cheyenne Canyon, Colorado  Visit Seven Falls in South Cheyenne Canyon, just outside of Colorado Springs, for a look at Colorado's unique natural wonder.  Climb the 224 stairs to the summit of the mountain to see the falls, or use the in-mountain elevator for a more relaxing ride. That's one method to make sure you get your daily steps!  38. Calf Creek Falls  Capitol Reef National Park, Utah  The Calf Creek Falls is only one of the many beautiful features of the Grand Staircase-Escalante region, which has some of the country's most stunning desert terrain.  Hikers must walk past beaver ponds and prehistoric rock art sites en route to the foot of the falls in order to reach the cascade.  39. Mesa Falls  Idaho  Lower Mesa Falls and Upper Mesa Falls are stunning waterfalls on the Henrys Fork of the Snake River in Idaho's Caribou-Targhee National Forest.  The river cascades down a small valley surrounded by thick greenery and steep wooded cliffs, over million-year-old volcanic rock. It was the first time my children had been so close to such a tremendous waterfall, and they were blown away.  Upper Mesa Falls includes a small boardwalk with several perspectives. Lower Mesa Falls is seen from Grandview Overlook and provides a long-distance view of the falls.  If you're looking for a little more adventure, there's a mile trek between the two waterfalls.  40. Ruby Falls  Chattanooga  While it may not be as magnificent or big as some of the other waterfalls on our top of the list, its distinctiveness as an underground waterfall and the tale of its discovery make it worthy of inclusion.  We followed the trail taken by its discoverer, Leo Lambert, in 1928, 260 feet down within the mountain, except he crawled through narrow places.  The stalagmites, stalagmites, and unique and magnificent rock formations are now illuminated by colorful lights.  The conclusion of the route leads to Ruby Falls, which is rendered even more stunning by the colorful light show that surrounds it. It is the United States' highest and deepest subterranean waterfall exposed to the public.  Read Also: Things to do in Nashville Things to do in California Bengal Cats for Sale  Every waterfall has its own individuality, from thunderous cascades to fantasy trickles. Some are tall and thin, rushing down cliff faces into swirling whirlpools below.  Others are gauzier, spreading out on rock and moss stairs. When the falls are frozen solid in winter, you may walk behind some of them and climb on others.  You're going to have to work up a sweat to get to some of the greatest waterfalls. They do, however, provide a refreshing respite and a striking reminder of nature's might.  Waterfalls cascade through national parks and preserves and are nestled away in state parks only known to locals. Waterfall enthusiasts will trek or bike thousands of kilometers to witness these outstanding examples of nature in action.  Please leave a comment, like this article on the Waterfalls Near Me, and tell your friends and family about it!

Bridal Veil Falls is the best place to see Colorado’s highest waterfall up close. It descends 365 feet and is incredible to see in person at any time of year—even when it’s frozen in the winter.

However, be advised, the climb to get there is difficult, so dress accordingly.

11. Raven Cliff Falls

At Caesar’s Head State Park, take the two-mile Raven Cliff Falls path to see the stunning 420-foot Raven Cliff Falls from a suspension bridge. There are also several hiking routes and campsites to choose from.

If you’re a more experienced hiker, you may take the Dismal Trail to the suspension bridge that spans the falls. It’s a challenging 8+ mile circle, but it’s well worth it.

12. Cumberland Falls

McCreary County / Whitley County, Kentucky

Waterfalls aren't the first thing that comes to mind when most people think of the Midwest.  Potato River Falls, near Gurney, Wisconsin, has been dubbed one of the region's most stunning waterfalls. The falls are clearly visible from various paths at the end of Potato River Falls Road in a county park.  The Upper and Lower Falls of the waterfall tumble 90 feet into the river. Hikers can reach the top of Potato River Falls by following the river bank on the half-mile route that leads to Upper Falls.  Autumn tourists will also have some fantastic opportunities to capture the fall hues.  33. Stepstone Falls in West Greenwich Rhode Island  At the end of the Ben Utter Trail, you'll find Stepstone Falls, a moderate cascade. It gets its name from the way the water rushes over the flat edges of the rocks, giving it the appearance of a slew of little stairs.  34. Sahalie Falls  Oregon  It is a 0.5 mile long one-way path that runs along a lush woodland beside the river, and the most stunning light blue water you will ever find.  Sahalie Falls is 100 feet (30 m) of spraying white water over a natural lava barrage. The film "Homeward bound" by Disney is stunning enough.  Koosah Falls descends to a deep pool around 21 m (70 ft) and offers a less spectacular but still worth viewing perspective. Go north and start with Koosah Falls (parking is better at Koosah.)  35. Tokatee Falls  Oregon  The observation point for this two-tiered waterfall roaring into the pools below is a short 0.6-mile hike. The higher falls drop 40 feet, while the lower falls plummet 80 feet over a steep basalt wall.  The route travels through a Douglas-fir, Western red cedar, large leaf maple, and Pacific yew old-growth forest. The North Umpqua Wild and Scenic River may be seen flowing down a tight rock canyon at many locations.  36. McWay Falls  California  McWay Falls is a definite highlight of a Big Sur road trip in California, known more for its spectacular coastal surrounds than the majesty of the Falls themselves.  McWay Falls, in Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park, is formed by water that falls straight from McWay Creek into the ocean (or the sand, depending on the tide levels).  The Falls truly come alive after sunset.  Hiking down to the bottom is both unlawful and dangerous. If they catch you, you might face a $300 fine. Ask a park ranger whether you can paddle down to the bottom in a kayak, as some people have done.  37. Seven Falls  South Cheyenne Canyon, Colorado  Visit Seven Falls in South Cheyenne Canyon, just outside of Colorado Springs, for a look at Colorado's unique natural wonder.  Climb the 224 stairs to the summit of the mountain to see the falls, or use the in-mountain elevator for a more relaxing ride. That's one method to make sure you get your daily steps!  38. Calf Creek Falls  Capitol Reef National Park, Utah  The Calf Creek Falls is only one of the many beautiful features of the Grand Staircase-Escalante region, which has some of the country's most stunning desert terrain.  Hikers must walk past beaver ponds and prehistoric rock art sites en route to the foot of the falls in order to reach the cascade.  39. Mesa Falls  Idaho  Lower Mesa Falls and Upper Mesa Falls are stunning waterfalls on the Henrys Fork of the Snake River in Idaho's Caribou-Targhee National Forest.  The river cascades down a small valley surrounded by thick greenery and steep wooded cliffs, over million-year-old volcanic rock. It was the first time my children had been so close to such a tremendous waterfall, and they were blown away.  Upper Mesa Falls includes a small boardwalk with several perspectives. Lower Mesa Falls is seen from Grandview Overlook and provides a long-distance view of the falls.  If you're looking for a little more adventure, there's a mile trek between the two waterfalls.  40. Ruby Falls  Chattanooga  While it may not be as magnificent or big as some of the other waterfalls on our top of the list, its distinctiveness as an underground waterfall and the tale of its discovery make it worthy of inclusion.  We followed the trail taken by its discoverer, Leo Lambert, in 1928, 260 feet down within the mountain, except he crawled through narrow places.  The stalagmites, stalagmites, and unique and magnificent rock formations are now illuminated by colorful lights.  The conclusion of the route leads to Ruby Falls, which is rendered even more stunning by the colorful light show that surrounds it. It is the United States' highest and deepest subterranean waterfall exposed to the public.  Read Also: Things to do in Nashville Things to do in California Bengal Cats for Sale  Every waterfall has its own individuality, from thunderous cascades to fantasy trickles. Some are tall and thin, rushing down cliff faces into swirling whirlpools below.  Others are gauzier, spreading out on rock and moss stairs. When the falls are frozen solid in winter, you may walk behind some of them and climb on others.  You're going to have to work up a sweat to get to some of the greatest waterfalls. They do, however, provide a refreshing respite and a striking reminder of nature's might.  Waterfalls cascade through national parks and preserves and are nestled away in state parks only known to locals. Waterfall enthusiasts will trek or bike thousands of kilometers to witness these outstanding examples of nature in action.  Please leave a comment, like this article on the Waterfalls Near Me, and tell your friends and family about it!

They call it the Niagara of the South, and we can see why after experiencing it for ourselves!

This traditionally broad and rectangular waterfall may have earned notoriety because of its ability to produce lunar rainbows (also known as moonbows). They are traditional rainbows over its base, which suited us well.

The addition of fall hues to an already bright setting!

13. Tahquamenon Falls

Paradise, Michigan, USA

Waterfalls aren't the first thing that comes to mind when most people think of the Midwest.  Potato River Falls, near Gurney, Wisconsin, has been dubbed one of the region's most stunning waterfalls. The falls are clearly visible from various paths at the end of Potato River Falls Road in a county park.  The Upper and Lower Falls of the waterfall tumble 90 feet into the river. Hikers can reach the top of Potato River Falls by following the river bank on the half-mile route that leads to Upper Falls.  Autumn tourists will also have some fantastic opportunities to capture the fall hues.  33. Stepstone Falls in West Greenwich Rhode Island  At the end of the Ben Utter Trail, you'll find Stepstone Falls, a moderate cascade. It gets its name from the way the water rushes over the flat edges of the rocks, giving it the appearance of a slew of little stairs.  34. Sahalie Falls  Oregon  It is a 0.5 mile long one-way path that runs along a lush woodland beside the river, and the most stunning light blue water you will ever find.  Sahalie Falls is 100 feet (30 m) of spraying white water over a natural lava barrage. The film "Homeward bound" by Disney is stunning enough.  Koosah Falls descends to a deep pool around 21 m (70 ft) and offers a less spectacular but still worth viewing perspective. Go north and start with Koosah Falls (parking is better at Koosah.)  35. Tokatee Falls  Oregon  The observation point for this two-tiered waterfall roaring into the pools below is a short 0.6-mile hike. The higher falls drop 40 feet, while the lower falls plummet 80 feet over a steep basalt wall.  The route travels through a Douglas-fir, Western red cedar, large leaf maple, and Pacific yew old-growth forest. The North Umpqua Wild and Scenic River may be seen flowing down a tight rock canyon at many locations.  36. McWay Falls  California  McWay Falls is a definite highlight of a Big Sur road trip in California, known more for its spectacular coastal surrounds than the majesty of the Falls themselves.  McWay Falls, in Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park, is formed by water that falls straight from McWay Creek into the ocean (or the sand, depending on the tide levels).  The Falls truly come alive after sunset.  Hiking down to the bottom is both unlawful and dangerous. If they catch you, you might face a $300 fine. Ask a park ranger whether you can paddle down to the bottom in a kayak, as some people have done.  37. Seven Falls  South Cheyenne Canyon, Colorado  Visit Seven Falls in South Cheyenne Canyon, just outside of Colorado Springs, for a look at Colorado's unique natural wonder.  Climb the 224 stairs to the summit of the mountain to see the falls, or use the in-mountain elevator for a more relaxing ride. That's one method to make sure you get your daily steps!  38. Calf Creek Falls  Capitol Reef National Park, Utah  The Calf Creek Falls is only one of the many beautiful features of the Grand Staircase-Escalante region, which has some of the country's most stunning desert terrain.  Hikers must walk past beaver ponds and prehistoric rock art sites en route to the foot of the falls in order to reach the cascade.  39. Mesa Falls  Idaho  Lower Mesa Falls and Upper Mesa Falls are stunning waterfalls on the Henrys Fork of the Snake River in Idaho's Caribou-Targhee National Forest.  The river cascades down a small valley surrounded by thick greenery and steep wooded cliffs, over million-year-old volcanic rock. It was the first time my children had been so close to such a tremendous waterfall, and they were blown away.  Upper Mesa Falls includes a small boardwalk with several perspectives. Lower Mesa Falls is seen from Grandview Overlook and provides a long-distance view of the falls.  If you're looking for a little more adventure, there's a mile trek between the two waterfalls.  40. Ruby Falls  Chattanooga  While it may not be as magnificent or big as some of the other waterfalls on our top of the list, its distinctiveness as an underground waterfall and the tale of its discovery make it worthy of inclusion.  We followed the trail taken by its discoverer, Leo Lambert, in 1928, 260 feet down within the mountain, except he crawled through narrow places.  The stalagmites, stalagmites, and unique and magnificent rock formations are now illuminated by colorful lights.  The conclusion of the route leads to Ruby Falls, which is rendered even more stunning by the colorful light show that surrounds it. It is the United States' highest and deepest subterranean waterfall exposed to the public.  Read Also: Things to do in Nashville Things to do in California Bengal Cats for Sale  Every waterfall has its own individuality, from thunderous cascades to fantasy trickles. Some are tall and thin, rushing down cliff faces into swirling whirlpools below.  Others are gauzier, spreading out on rock and moss stairs. When the falls are frozen solid in winter, you may walk behind some of them and climb on others.  You're going to have to work up a sweat to get to some of the greatest waterfalls. They do, however, provide a refreshing respite and a striking reminder of nature's might.  Waterfalls cascade through national parks and preserves and are nestled away in state parks only known to locals. Waterfall enthusiasts will trek or bike thousands of kilometers to witness these outstanding examples of nature in action.  Please leave a comment, like this article on the Waterfalls Near Me, and tell your friends and family about it!

While we knew that the Upper Peninsula of Michigan featured several waterfalls as well as the stunning Pictured Rocks, the typical block shape of this waterfall on a wide tannin-stained river caught our attention.

We were able to enjoy this splendor from several locations, all of which had a natural aspect distinctive of the UP. Also, we couldn’t dispute its beauty, whether we saw it from the edge or from a distance away from the Tahquamenon River’s banks.

Lower Tahquamenon Falls, a cascade further downstream, was also part of this huge waterfall.

Autumn leaves, if timed well, may give even more color to an already beautiful scene.

Read Also:

rainbow falls

There are many beautiful waterfalls in the Finger Lakes region, but Watkins Glen State Park seems like something out of Lord of the Rings.

Four paths, 19 waterfalls, a lily pond, an ecological path, and a 151-year-old suspension bridge can be found in the glen.

Enter at the South Entrance and climb Couch’s Staircase (120 fern-covered stairs), then sneak behind the curtain of water at Cavern Cascade, scale the 180-step Jacob’s Ladder, and return along the North Rim Trail overlooking the gorge for a three-mile exercise.

Don’t miss Rainbow Falls, which got its name from the way sunlight cracks when it hits the water just so, or Central Cascade, which is the tallest fall at 60 feet.

Waterfalls aren't the first thing that comes to mind when most people think of the Midwest.  Potato River Falls, near Gurney, Wisconsin, has been dubbed one of the region's most stunning waterfalls. The falls are clearly visible from various paths at the end of Potato River Falls Road in a county park.  The Upper and Lower Falls of the waterfall tumble 90 feet into the river. Hikers can reach the top of Potato River Falls by following the river bank on the half-mile route that leads to Upper Falls.  Autumn tourists will also have some fantastic opportunities to capture the fall hues.  33. Stepstone Falls in West Greenwich Rhode Island  At the end of the Ben Utter Trail, you'll find Stepstone Falls, a moderate cascade. It gets its name from the way the water rushes over the flat edges of the rocks, giving it the appearance of a slew of little stairs.  34. Sahalie Falls  Oregon  It is a 0.5 mile long one-way path that runs along a lush woodland beside the river, and the most stunning light blue water you will ever find.  Sahalie Falls is 100 feet (30 m) of spraying white water over a natural lava barrage. The film "Homeward bound" by Disney is stunning enough.  Koosah Falls descends to a deep pool around 21 m (70 ft) and offers a less spectacular but still worth viewing perspective. Go north and start with Koosah Falls (parking is better at Koosah.)  35. Tokatee Falls  Oregon  The observation point for this two-tiered waterfall roaring into the pools below is a short 0.6-mile hike. The higher falls drop 40 feet, while the lower falls plummet 80 feet over a steep basalt wall.  The route travels through a Douglas-fir, Western red cedar, large leaf maple, and Pacific yew old-growth forest. The North Umpqua Wild and Scenic River may be seen flowing down a tight rock canyon at many locations.  36. McWay Falls  California  McWay Falls is a definite highlight of a Big Sur road trip in California, known more for its spectacular coastal surrounds than the majesty of the Falls themselves.  McWay Falls, in Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park, is formed by water that falls straight from McWay Creek into the ocean (or the sand, depending on the tide levels).  The Falls truly come alive after sunset.  Hiking down to the bottom is both unlawful and dangerous. If they catch you, you might face a $300 fine. Ask a park ranger whether you can paddle down to the bottom in a kayak, as some people have done.  37. Seven Falls  South Cheyenne Canyon, Colorado  Visit Seven Falls in South Cheyenne Canyon, just outside of Colorado Springs, for a look at Colorado's unique natural wonder.  Climb the 224 stairs to the summit of the mountain to see the falls, or use the in-mountain elevator for a more relaxing ride. That's one method to make sure you get your daily steps!  38. Calf Creek Falls  Capitol Reef National Park, Utah  The Calf Creek Falls is only one of the many beautiful features of the Grand Staircase-Escalante region, which has some of the country's most stunning desert terrain.  Hikers must walk past beaver ponds and prehistoric rock art sites en route to the foot of the falls in order to reach the cascade.  39. Mesa Falls  Idaho  Lower Mesa Falls and Upper Mesa Falls are stunning waterfalls on the Henrys Fork of the Snake River in Idaho's Caribou-Targhee National Forest.  The river cascades down a small valley surrounded by thick greenery and steep wooded cliffs, over million-year-old volcanic rock. It was the first time my children had been so close to such a tremendous waterfall, and they were blown away.  Upper Mesa Falls includes a small boardwalk with several perspectives. Lower Mesa Falls is seen from Grandview Overlook and provides a long-distance view of the falls.  If you're looking for a little more adventure, there's a mile trek between the two waterfalls.  40. Ruby Falls  Chattanooga  While it may not be as magnificent or big as some of the other waterfalls on our top of the list, its distinctiveness as an underground waterfall and the tale of its discovery make it worthy of inclusion.  We followed the trail taken by its discoverer, Leo Lambert, in 1928, 260 feet down within the mountain, except he crawled through narrow places.  The stalagmites, stalagmites, and unique and magnificent rock formations are now illuminated by colorful lights.  The conclusion of the route leads to Ruby Falls, which is rendered even more stunning by the colorful light show that surrounds it. It is the United States' highest and deepest subterranean waterfall exposed to the public.  Read Also: Things to do in Nashville Things to do in California Bengal Cats for Sale  Every waterfall has its own individuality, from thunderous cascades to fantasy trickles. Some are tall and thin, rushing down cliff faces into swirling whirlpools below.  Others are gauzier, spreading out on rock and moss stairs. When the falls are frozen solid in winter, you may walk behind some of them and climb on others.  You're going to have to work up a sweat to get to some of the greatest waterfalls. They do, however, provide a refreshing respite and a striking reminder of nature's might.  Waterfalls cascade through national parks and preserves and are nestled away in state parks only known to locals. Waterfall enthusiasts will trek or bike thousands of kilometers to witness these outstanding examples of nature in action.  Please leave a comment, like this article on the Waterfalls Near Me, and tell your friends and family about it!

Nicknamed the West Niagara, the snakes are really larger and impressively broad than the genuine Niagara (212 feet) (900 feet).

This makes it one of the largest natural falls in the country and since the Oregon Trail days, it has been a hopping tourist attraction.

A normal flow is between 10,000 and 12,000 cubic feet a second, although the meltwater can reach up to 20,000 cubic feet per second during a severe winter with high snowfall.

Spring is usually the ideal season to go, but before going out, tourists should check the live stream for Shoshone Falls constantly.

19. Multnomah Falls

Columbia River Gorge, Oregon

This major attraction of the famed Columbia River Gorge, which descends 620 feet every year, is one of the most recognizable waterfalls in the United States.

The gorge itself is home to several waterfalls, several of which are impressive in magnitude.

It’s a strong contender for the title of Oregon’s top natural attraction! And it’s easy to see why following our trips to this waterfall.

With a waterfall-like beauty, I had no choice but to include it in our Top 10 list.

Starved Rock State Park is catnip for waterfall chasers, nestled among bucolic cornfields about two hours southwest of Chicago. Melting glaciers sculpted 18 sandstone canyons throughout the 2,800-acre park, which erupt with waterfalls every spring.

With 14 miles of hiking paths, this is a place where you may pick your own adventure: You may hike behind LaSalle Waterfall’s 25-foot veil, gaze in wonder at Tonty Canyon’s 60-foot twin falls, or marvel at the park’s two 80-footers, one in St. Louis Canyon and the other in Wildcat Canyon.

Are you feeling daring? Plan a visit during the winter, when the park allows skilled ice climbers to slither up three of the area’s most well-known falls.

22. Amicalola Falls

Dawsonville, Georgia

near me

In Cherokee, the name “Amicalola” means “tumbling rivers,” which perfectly describes Amicalola Falls. With a drop of 729 feet, it is the third-highest cascading waterfall east of the Mississippi River.

It may be found near the southern terminus of the 2,000-mile-long Appalachian Trail.

24. Union Falls

Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Waterfalls aren't the first thing that comes to mind when most people think of the Midwest.  Potato River Falls, near Gurney, Wisconsin, has been dubbed one of the region's most stunning waterfalls. The falls are clearly visible from various paths at the end of Potato River Falls Road in a county park.  The Upper and Lower Falls of the waterfall tumble 90 feet into the river. Hikers can reach the top of Potato River Falls by following the river bank on the half-mile route that leads to Upper Falls.  Autumn tourists will also have some fantastic opportunities to capture the fall hues.  33. Stepstone Falls in West Greenwich Rhode Island  At the end of the Ben Utter Trail, you'll find Stepstone Falls, a moderate cascade. It gets its name from the way the water rushes over the flat edges of the rocks, giving it the appearance of a slew of little stairs.  34. Sahalie Falls  Oregon  It is a 0.5 mile long one-way path that runs along a lush woodland beside the river, and the most stunning light blue water you will ever find.  Sahalie Falls is 100 feet (30 m) of spraying white water over a natural lava barrage. The film "Homeward bound" by Disney is stunning enough.  Koosah Falls descends to a deep pool around 21 m (70 ft) and offers a less spectacular but still worth viewing perspective. Go north and start with Koosah Falls (parking is better at Koosah.)  35. Tokatee Falls  Oregon  The observation point for this two-tiered waterfall roaring into the pools below is a short 0.6-mile hike. The higher falls drop 40 feet, while the lower falls plummet 80 feet over a steep basalt wall.  The route travels through a Douglas-fir, Western red cedar, large leaf maple, and Pacific yew old-growth forest. The North Umpqua Wild and Scenic River may be seen flowing down a tight rock canyon at many locations.  36. McWay Falls  California  McWay Falls is a definite highlight of a Big Sur road trip in California, known more for its spectacular coastal surrounds than the majesty of the Falls themselves.  McWay Falls, in Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park, is formed by water that falls straight from McWay Creek into the ocean (or the sand, depending on the tide levels).  The Falls truly come alive after sunset.  Hiking down to the bottom is both unlawful and dangerous. If they catch you, you might face a $300 fine. Ask a park ranger whether you can paddle down to the bottom in a kayak, as some people have done.  37. Seven Falls  South Cheyenne Canyon, Colorado  Visit Seven Falls in South Cheyenne Canyon, just outside of Colorado Springs, for a look at Colorado's unique natural wonder.  Climb the 224 stairs to the summit of the mountain to see the falls, or use the in-mountain elevator for a more relaxing ride. That's one method to make sure you get your daily steps!  38. Calf Creek Falls  Capitol Reef National Park, Utah  The Calf Creek Falls is only one of the many beautiful features of the Grand Staircase-Escalante region, which has some of the country's most stunning desert terrain.  Hikers must walk past beaver ponds and prehistoric rock art sites en route to the foot of the falls in order to reach the cascade.  39. Mesa Falls  Idaho  Lower Mesa Falls and Upper Mesa Falls are stunning waterfalls on the Henrys Fork of the Snake River in Idaho's Caribou-Targhee National Forest.  The river cascades down a small valley surrounded by thick greenery and steep wooded cliffs, over million-year-old volcanic rock. It was the first time my children had been so close to such a tremendous waterfall, and they were blown away.  Upper Mesa Falls includes a small boardwalk with several perspectives. Lower Mesa Falls is seen from Grandview Overlook and provides a long-distance view of the falls.  If you're looking for a little more adventure, there's a mile trek between the two waterfalls.  40. Ruby Falls  Chattanooga  While it may not be as magnificent or big as some of the other waterfalls on our top of the list, its distinctiveness as an underground waterfall and the tale of its discovery make it worthy of inclusion.  We followed the trail taken by its discoverer, Leo Lambert, in 1928, 260 feet down within the mountain, except he crawled through narrow places.  The stalagmites, stalagmites, and unique and magnificent rock formations are now illuminated by colorful lights.  The conclusion of the route leads to Ruby Falls, which is rendered even more stunning by the colorful light show that surrounds it. It is the United States' highest and deepest subterranean waterfall exposed to the public.  Read Also: Things to do in Nashville Things to do in California Bengal Cats for Sale  Every waterfall has its own individuality, from thunderous cascades to fantasy trickles. Some are tall and thin, rushing down cliff faces into swirling whirlpools below.  Others are gauzier, spreading out on rock and moss stairs. When the falls are frozen solid in winter, you may walk behind some of them and climb on others.  You're going to have to work up a sweat to get to some of the greatest waterfalls. They do, however, provide a refreshing respite and a striking reminder of nature's might.  Waterfalls cascade through national parks and preserves and are nestled away in state parks only known to locals. Waterfall enthusiasts will trek or bike thousands of kilometers to witness these outstanding examples of nature in action.  Please leave a comment, like this article on the Waterfalls Near Me, and tell your friends and family about it!

This one needed the greatest effort to reach all the waterfalls on this list.

The walk involved a bullying ford of rivers, a severe shift of height while passing into the territory of grizzly bears. But the ultimate prize for this expedition was the waterfall.

Drop 260ft, with two major rivers unequaled by any other great waterfall that we’ve seen with a sensitive elegance, there’s just no other waterfall like that!

As if it weren’t enough, the thermal waterfall and cascade in the pool of Ouzel took a brief side trip.

25. Niagara Falls

Near Buffalo, New York

It is the United States’ Granddaddy of Waterfalls, far surpassing all others in terms of pure power, magnitude, popularity, and more.

Bring your passport and visit this world-famous destination on both sides of the border, which is shared by Western New York in the United States and Southeastern Ontario in Canada.

You’ll not only get a complete view of the falls from several vantage points, but you’ll also get to take part in a variety of activities.

I considered this waterfall one of the World’s Big Three, thus it easily takes the top place among America’s Top 10.

26. Blackwater Falls

Davis, West Virginia

waterfalls near

At West Virginia’s Blackwater Falls State Park, the black water of the appropriately called Blackwater Falls cascades five stories into the river below.

The amber-colored river plunges down and twists through the 8-mile long canyon, which may be seen from a variety of locations around the park.

Also, the tannic acid from fallen hemlock and red spruce needles caused the colored water that lends the place. The falls are accessible all year, with a stunning display of wildflowers, panoramic vistas, and a sled run in the winter.

27. Vernal Fall

Yosemite, California

Visitors to Vernal Fall are treated for a close-up look by taking the Mist Trail or the John Muir Trail inside California’s Yosemite National Park.

Vernal Fall is less than a mile away from a footbridge. The two paths differ only across the bridge. Adventurous wanderers can follow the Mist Trail to the summit of the 317-foot Vernal Fall, up to six hundred granite steps of the ‘huge natural escalator.’

In spring and early summer, expect waterfall spray. You will discover the beautiful Nevada Fall beyond Vernal Fall on the Mist Trail.

Also, the Park stays open and falling is accessible as a wildfire hits Yosemite at the end of July.

28. Waipo’o Falls, in Kaua’i

Hawaii

If you’re visiting Hawaii during the rainy season, you must see Waipo’o Falls.

The 800-foot waterfall stands out among Hawaii’s other waterfalls because it features a magnificent background of the Grand Canyon of the Pacific, often known as Waimea Canyon.

29. Cataract Falls

Marin County, Indiana

waterfalls

On Mill Creek, Cataract Falls up of two sets of falls. The Upper Falls are roughly 45 feet tall, while the Lower Falls are around 30 feet tall. And it is the state of Indiana’s biggest waterfall.

30. Spray Falls

Mt Rainier National Park, Pierce County, Washington

As you can see from the photo, considering its grandeur and unusual twisting shape, this almost 300ft gigantic waterfall ranks high on our list.

Despite sharing the same reserve and governmental boundaries as the other waterfalls on this list, had to travel Mt Rainier’s more distant north-face at Mowich Lake to get here.

The walk itself provided tantalizing glimpses of Mt Rainier’s towering glacier-covered slopes and jumbles of hexagonal basalt stones that had peeled from the volcano.

To get this picture, had to cross a swollen Spray Creek, which was experiencing exceptionally Spring-like conditions in mid-August 2011.

31. Walupt Falls

Gifford Pinchot National Forest, Lewis County, Washington

waterfalls near me

This one arguably has the most unique shape of all the waterfalls on our pick of the finest in Washington.

In fact, the more eccentric and distant Union Falls in Yellowstone National Park could only compete against it in its eccentric form.

That said, it took a genuine experience to reach this waterfall, which is located deep in a distant area of the National Gifford Pinchot Forest, between Mt St Helens and Mt Rainier. There’s no well-maintained route here.

32. Potato River Falls

Gurney Wisconsin

Waterfalls aren’t the first thing that comes to mind when most people think of the Midwest.

Potato River Falls, near Gurney, Wisconsin, has been dubbed one of the region’s most stunning waterfalls. The falls are clearly visible from various paths at the end of Potato River Falls Road in a county park.

However, the Upper and Lower Falls of the waterfall tumble 90 feet into the river. Hikers can reach the top of Potato River Falls by following the river bank on the half-mile route that leads to Upper Falls.

Autumn tourists will also have some fantastic opportunities to capture the fall hues.

33. Stepstone Falls in West Greenwich

Rhode Island

At the end of the Ben Utter Trail, you’ll find Stepstone Falls, a moderate cascade. It gets its name from the way the water rushes over the flat edges of the rocks, giving it the appearance of a slew of little stairs.

34. Sahalie Falls

Oregon

It is a 0.5 mile long one-way path that runs along a lush woodland beside the river, and the most stunning light blue water you will ever find.

Sahalie Falls is 100 feet (30 m) of spraying white water over a natural lava barrage. The film “Homeward bound” by Disney is stunning enough.

Koosah Falls descends to a deep pool around 21 m (70 ft) and offers a less spectacular but still worth viewing perspective. Go north and start with Koosah Falls (parking is better at Koosah.)

35. Tokatee Falls

Oregon

waterfalls

The observation point for this two-tiered waterfall roaring into the pools below is a short 0.6-mile hike. Also, the higher falls drop 40 feet, while the lower falls plummet 80 feet over a steep basalt wall.

The route travels through a Douglas-fir, Western red cedar, large leaf maple, and Pacific yew old-growth forest. Additionally, the North Umpqua Wild and Scenic River may be seen flowing down a tight rock canyon at many locations.

36. McWay Falls

California

mcway falls

McWay Falls is a definite highlight of a Big Sur road trip in California, known more for its spectacular coastal surrounds than the majesty of the Falls themselves.

The McWay Falls, in Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park, is formed by water that falls straight from McWay Creek into the ocean (or the sand, depending on the tide levels).

Also, the Falls truly come alive after sunset. Hiking down to the bottom is both unlawful and dangerous.

However, if they catch you, you might face a $300 fine. Ask a park ranger whether you can paddle down to the bottom in a kayak, as some people have done.

37. Seven Falls

South Cheyenne Canyon, Colorado

Visit Seven Falls in South Cheyenne Canyon, just outside of Colorado Springs, for a look at Colorado’s unique natural wonder.

Climb the 224 stairs to the summit of the mountain to see the falls, or use the in-mountain elevator for a more relaxing ride. That’s one method to make sure you get your daily steps!

38. Calf Creek Falls

Capitol Reef National Park, Utah

The Calf Creek Falls is only one of the many beautiful features of the Grand Staircase-Escalante region, which has some of the country’s most stunning desert terrain.

Hikers must walk past beaver ponds and prehistoric rock art sites en route to the foot of the falls in order to reach the cascade.

39. Mesa Falls

Idaho

waterfalls near me

Lower Mesa Falls and Upper Mesa Falls are stunning waterfalls on the Henrys Fork of the Snake River in Idaho’s Caribou-Targhee National Forest.

The river cascades down a small valley surrounded by thick greenery and steep wooded cliffs, over million-year-old volcanic rock.

It was the first time my children had been so close to such a tremendous waterfall, and they were blown away. Upper Mesa Falls includes a small boardwalk with several perspectives.

Lower Mesa Falls is seen from Grandview Overlook and provides a long-distance view of the falls. If you’re looking for a little more adventure, there’s a mile trek between the two waterfalls.

40. Ruby Falls

Chattanooga

While it may not be as magnificent or big as some of the other waterfalls on our top of the list, its distinctiveness as an underground waterfall and the tale of its discovery make it worthy of inclusion.

We followed the trail taken by its discoverer, Leo Lambert, in 1928, 260 feet down within the mountain, except he crawled through narrow places.

The stalagmites, stalagmites, and unique and magnificent rock formations are now illuminated by colorful lights.

Also, the conclusion of the route leads to Ruby Falls, which is rendered even more stunning by the colorful light show that surrounds it. It is the United States’ highest and deepest subterranean waterfall exposed to the public.

Read Also:

Every waterfall has its own individuality, from thunderous cascades to fantasy trickles. Some are tall and thin, rushing down cliff faces into swirling whirlpools below.

Others are gauzier, spreading out on rock and moss stairs. When the falls are frozen solid in winter, you may walk behind some of them and climb on others.

You’re going to have to work up a sweat to get to some of the greatest waterfalls. They do, however, provide a refreshing respite and a striking reminder of nature’s might.

Waterfalls cascade through national parks and preserves and are nestled away in state parks only known to locals. Also, Waterfall enthusiasts will trek or bike thousands of kilometers to witness these outstanding examples of nature in action.

Please leave a comment, like this article on the Waterfalls Near Me, and tell your friends and family about it!

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