Visual Studio Code Vs Atom: Which Code Editor is Better

Visual Studio Code Vs Atom: Which Code Editor is Better.

Visual Studio Code Vs Atom: Both the VS Code and Atom are open-source code editors, originally created by Microsoft and GitHub respectively. Each of these editors is based on Electron – a framework for creating “native” desktop apps.

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Similarities Between Atom and Visual Studio Code

Both Atom and Visual Studio Code were made using Electron, a strong framework built by GitHub.

As mentioned earlier, Microsoft developed Visual Studio Code, and this is actually a crossover point with Atom.

Atom was made by Github, but Microsoft bought Github in 2018, so now both are Microsoft products.

Atom and VSCode are fully functional text editors before you customize them to your skillset and coding style.

What’s more, both rely on plugins and extensions to achieve optimal efficiency for your working experience.

Luckily, since they’re both open-source, their libraries are extensive and consistently growing!

VSCode Configuration vs Atom Configuration

With tons of extensions and customization comes a lot of configuration.

And, whether you agree with me or not, it represents an important part of the overall user experience of the editor.

Configuration of VS Code involved only a simple JSON file… up until recently. Now, whenever it’s possible, a GUI interface is available. It’s fairly simple, but it does its job, and it does it well.

It’s just a small abstraction over what we had already available with JSON and TS-based autocompletion.

On the Atom’s side, things look only a bit different. Instead of having a singular JSON file to edit, you have GUI everywhere!

The editor settings themselves are completely separated from the extensions, as each of those has its own, dedicated page.

I consider this a pretty good approach. Sadly, some users report lags and other performance issues, during the configuration process.

Maybe it’s because of them having just too many extensions installed? Personally, I haven’t experienced similar issues, maybe because of my fairly small number of installed extensions, but who knows?

Atom Percs and Weaknesses

  • With Atom it feels like every part of the program is open to be modified.
  • Also, value is placed on the aesthetic experience of using a program where, at any point, you can go into the source code, tweak it, and rebuild it.
  •  If you download a package and you are less than happy about how it’s working, I can change that package.
  • Every Electron app contains a minimum amount of bulk. Atom is a bit slow and has a few substantial bugs and doesn’t hold your hand about anything, but for those flaws, you can get an editor that is putty in my hands, it’s potentially limited only by my understanding of JavaScript.
  • Atom feels like something you can use for as long as you are typing things up on a computer, for every purpose.

VSCode Perks

  • Support for multiple programming languages: It supports multiple programming languages.
  • Intelli-Sense: It can detect if any snippet of code is left incomplete. Also, common variable syntaxes and variable declarations are made automatically.
  • Cross-Platform Support: Traditionally, editors used to support either the Windows or Linux, or Mac Systems. But Visual Studio Code is cross-platform.
  • Extensions and Support: Usually supports all the programming languages but, if the user/programmer wants to use the programming language which is not supported then
  • Repository: With the ever-increasing demand for the code, secure and timely storage is equally important
  • Web-Support: Comes with built-in support for Web applications. So web-applications can be built and supported in VSC.

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