Sick Text Messages to tell your Boss: Best Examples Shown

Sick Text Messages to tell your Boss: Different institutions have different policies regarding texting, thus if your boss approves texting him or her then your text message should clearly and emphatically let him/her know that you won’t be coming to work and the day he/she can expect you to return to work.

For instance, you can say: “Hello, (your boss’ name). I’m not feeling well today and need to take the day off. I’ll be at work tomorrow. Thanks, ( and then your name).”

Sick Text Messages to tell your Boss 2020: Examples Shown

If sickness or injury is very serious and you need to take more than a few days off, the best option would be to include more information or decide for a conversation with your supervisor.

Below, we have information on when it’s right to text when you’re sick and what you should include in your text message, including a list of examples you can use.

Step by step instructions to Text in Sick

While calling while sick is the most widely recognized approach to report impromptu nonattendance from work, a few organizations enable their employees to text when you’re sick. If you often text your boss about work, then texting him when you sick won’t be a problem.

Regardless, some expert has set rules against texting when you sick and requires that you call or make a report that you sick and you can’t come to work; you can ask your director or the HR office or check your employee handbook for details.

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If it is permitted to call when you’re sick, a great standard guideline is to keep your message clear and straightforward. Remember the accompanying tips when drafting your content:

  • Contact your boss/supervisor/manager directly. Don’t ask a co-worker to tell him/her for you.
  • Contact your boss as early as possible. If it’s your job to find a replacement, be sure to include this information. If not, texting earlier rather than later will give your boss time to delegate any urgent tasks and/or find someone to cover your shift.
  • Don’t give too many details. Your boss doesn’t need an in-depth description of your illness. A short sentence or two explainings that you’re too ill to do your job effectively and when he/she can expect you to return to work is all that’s needed.
  • Keep it professional. Though texting is usually an informal means of communication, when texting your boss, it’s best to type in full sentences with proper capitalization and punctuation. Your message should read like a short email — not a text to a friend.
  • If your boss doesn’t reply to your message, be sure to follow up with a call. Text messages can fail or your boss may have his/her phone off. It’s your responsibility to make sure to report your absence.
  • If you have a serious condition, you’ll probably want to have a conversation with your boss instead. A serious illness or injury could lead to several days/weeks/months off work and may involve a disability or worker’s compensation claim.

Sick? Text Message to Boss Examples

Following the above guidelines, we’ve provided a few examples you can use to text in sick. Be sure to add a greeting at the beginning of the text — a simple “Hello, (your boss’ name),” should suffice. You may also want to sign the text with “Thanks, (your name),” or “Thank you for understanding, (your name)” as a sign of appreciation.

  • If you need one day off:
    • “I have (the flu/a cold/etc.) and need to take a sick day. (Coworker’s name) has agreed to cover my shift today, and I should be well enough to be at work tomorrow.”
    • “I’m feeling ill today and don’t think I can do my job efficiently. I need to take the day off.”
    • “I’m not feeling well today and need to take the day off.”
    • “I’m not feeling well and need to use a sick day, but I’ll be back at work tomorrow.”
    • “I started feeling ill last night and am not feeling any better today, so I need to take the day off.”
  • If you need several days off:
    • “I have (the flu/a cold/etc.) and need to take the rest of the week off. (Coworker’s name) will cover my shifts today and tomorrow, and I’m planning to return on Monday.”
    • “I’m sick with (the flu/a cold/ etc.), and my doctor has recommended taking a few days off. I will return to work on (day of the week you plan to return).”
    • “I need to take today and tomorrow off from work. I visited the doctor and have (the flu/a cold/etc.).”
    • “I’m very sick and need to take a few days off. I hope to be well enough to return on (day of the week you plan to return).”
    • “I won’t be able to make it in today or tomorrow due to an unexpected illness.”
  • If you’re unsure how long you’ll need:
    • “I am sick and won’t be able to make it today. I hope I’ll be well enough to come in tomorrow, but I may need to take an extra day. I’ll keep you posted.”
    • “I have a fever and think I may be coming down with something, so I need to take a sick day today. I hope I’m feeling well enough to come in tomorrow, but I’ll check in later to let you know.”
    • “I need to take a sick day today and maybe tomorrow. I am not feeling well enough to work and don’t want to get anyone else sick.”
    • “I need to take a sick day or possibly a few days off. I started feeling ill yesterday and am feeling worse today. I’ll keep you posted to let you know if I’m feeling well enough to come in tomorrow.”
    • “I need to take a few days off for health reasons. I hope to return to work on (day of the week you plan to return). I will keep you posted.”
  • If you’re unsure how long you’ll need and plan to visit the doctor:
    • “I am sick and going to the doctor, so I won’t be able to make it today. I may need to take the rest of the week off. I’ll check back in after my appointment.”
    • “I’m feeling ill and worried I may be coming down with something so I’m going to the doctor. I will not be able to make it in today, but (coworker’s name) is available to cover my shift.”
    • “I’m not feeling well and won’t be able to make it in today. I hope to return to work tomorrow. I’m going to the doctor. I’ll keep you posted.”
    • “I need to take today off. I’m not feeling well and have made a doctor’s appointment. I’m hoping it’s just a 24-hour bug, but I will keep you posted.”
    • “I will not be able to make it today. I think I have (the flu/cold/etc.) and have made an appointment with my doctor. I’ll check in later to let you know if I need to take additional sick days.”

In Summary

Texting when sick isn’t accepted in every working environment, yet in the event that your boss approves of texting when sick, keep your message clear and straightforward.

We’ve given a few guides to enable you to draft your message, from straightforward notes when you need one free day to what you should state when you may require a couple of days off.

Make sure to development if your boss doesn’t answer to your message, in the event that it wasn’t gotten.

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